PA503M.3

Clinical Clerkship in Pathology Informatics

Sites: MGH
Director(s): Veronica Klepeis, Alberto Puig
Prerequisites: HMS Principal Clinical Experience (Core Clinical Clerkships) or equivalent
Offered: Full time for one month.
Location: MGH - Mass. General Hospital (3)
Open to Exclerks: Yes (may be restricted for international students)
Description: Prior approval required, please email Dr. Klepeis; vklepeis@mgh.harvard.edu. Pathology Informatics uses data management, imaging and information theory to facilitate the diagnostic, research, and patient care missions of Pathology. This course will introduce students to the challenges and accomplishments in Pathology Informatics, while simultaneously providing integrated exposure to several subspecialty areas within the pathology department (i.e. surgical pathology, molecular pathology, cytopathology, laboratory medicine, etc.). Didactic sessions and hands-on laboratory experience from the core of the rotation. The student will also have the opportunity to work closely with faculty, fellows, and residents on a project of mutual interest. At the end of the clerkship, the student will present to the department on a topic of his or her choice. While the course is primarily organized to provide preparation for a potential career in Pathology, students interested in other areas of medicine will be able to gain insights into the role of pathologists and laboratory information systems in medical and surgical diagnosis and management. Previous computer experience is not required, but may be helpful. Enrollment is subject to the pre-approval of the course director, Dr. John Gilbertson.
Incorporation of Basic Science Content and Evidence-Based Medicine:
Discussing basic science is a key component of one weekly conference, which all students, residents, fellows and faculty attend. Students are expected to incorporate basic science into one formal presentation during the course of the month.
Grade Criteria:
Honors with Distinction:
Demonstrates exceptional grasp of the learning objectives, in comparison to his/her peers; contributes meaningfully to academic discourse during the rotation; leaves a memorable and favorable impression on the faculty.
Honors:
Meets and often exceeds goals and objectives; performs better than most of his/her peers; demonstrates reliability and enthusiasm; interacts well with colleagues.
Satisfactory:
Meets all learning objectives; demonstrates knowledge acquisition over the course of the rotation.
Unsatisfactory:
Demonstrates lack of effort and initiative; is unreliable; fails to meet some or all learning objectives.